Agent Monday: Introverts Unite! Networking for Writers

Caroline Noonan Head Shot

Caroline Noonan

Happy Agent Monday, everyone!  Writers are often introverts. People who enjoy sitting alone and writing far more than being at the center of attention. Yet these days writers MUST get out into the world for their writing and for their careers. Today I’m pleased to welcome our client Caroline Noonan, who is here to give us all some painless tips on how we writers can connect…and on why it’s vital that we do.

The Importance of Networking for Writers
By Caroline Noonan

Definition: noun net·work·ing: Connecting with other people to exchange information and develop contacts; the cultivation of productive relationships for employment or business.

Hmmm, you say. Doesn’t apply to writers. Writing is about me, my laptop and my awesome manuscript. Well you’re right. To a point. But nowadays we are expected to self-promote, self-market and be our own editors. We are asked to speak, maintain websites and have a presence on social media. And if that’s not bad enough, a great many of us are introverts. Introverts prefer to listen and observe. We are reflective and focused and speak through our art. Networking goes against our very nature and can feel disingenuous.

But consider the potential benefits of a little networking:

• Are you looking for feedback on your manuscript before querying?
• Would you like to find critique partners whose opinion you trust?
• Would you like support and encouragement from like-minded individuals?
• Are you actively seeking an agent or an editor?
• Do you want to make writing your career?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you should seriously consider networking. Okay, so maybe I’ve piqued your interest. The next step is How? Here are a four practical ways that have helped me personally:

1. Meetup. Meetup.com is the world’s largest network of local groups, making it easy to organize or find an existing group in your area. I found my local writer’s group and my regular critique partners through Meetup. Yes, I was biting my nails and psyching myself out before that first meeting, but it was smooth sailing after that. Remember, give the same courtesy and consideration in critiquing other’s work that you would like given to yours.

2. Join a Professional Writer’s Organization. There are many organizations who connect you with other writers and organize local events, such as the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). These organizations have strong on-line communities, as well as terrific regional and national conferences that are well attended by other writers, agents and editors (some of whom give preferential consideration to organization members).

3. Go to a Writer’s Conference. I suggest starting with a local or regional conference. Get there early and introduce yourself to the folks sitting around you. Ask them what genre they write and what they are working on. Ask them for a business card. Maybe even follow them on Twitter. (Follow Caroline @carolinehnoonan)

4. Social Media. There is a huge on-line community of writers, especially on Twitter. Many literary agents run contests on Twitter, and I know individuals who have found their critique partners there. Social Media is a great place to share ideas, connect with others and give someone a nod of encouragement when they need it. Next time, it might be you needing the nod!

I hope you find these ideas as helpful and practical as I did. Just remember, writers are basically all nice people, and nearly everyone is in the same boat as you!

 

Caroline Noonan’s debut YA novel Till Someday is a riveting contemporary about a girl eager to turn 18 and finally take charge of her life beyond foster care, but life keeps getting in her way. Caroline writes with authority — she grew up in foster care from the ages of 4-18, and got on with her own life, becoming an aerospace engineer for NASA, and a technical writer/editor for the space industry.

 

*Marie is an Associate Agent at The Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency in New York City. To keep up with all her Agent Monday posts, subscribe to her site.

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Agent Monday: Inspiring!

Laptop on Kitchen Table with Cup of CoffeeHappy Agent Monday, world!  I’m currently posting from Washington, DC, where I’ve “landed” after finishing up an amazing weekend at the SCBWI MD DE WV regional conference Lucky 13. Count me lucky for being invited as a guest speaker at what proved to be yet another wonderful conference hosted by the Society of Children’s Writers and Illustrators!  It was an opportunity to meet with so many talented people involved in the book business from agents to editors to authors and illustrators, in addition to many extraordinarily talented and kind aspiring authors and illustrators.  If I could find one word to describe the experience, it would be INSPIRING.

We writers sometimes spend a lot of time lost in our heads creating, squirreled away in a corner with our laptops. We gather inspiration from our thoughts and dreams and past experiences, but sometimes, oh sometimes, we all need to meet other people who “get” us creative types.  Other people who dream like we do and aspire for what we aspire.

As an author, I listened to the gritty and heart-wrenching experiences master storyteller Chris Crutcher shared in his talks. I was moved and inspired.  It made me want to be more daring in my own writing, to dig deeper into the darker truths that a story can sometimes skate around. As an artist (who hasn’t drawn in a while, I confess), I watched the endlessly talented illustrator Floyd Cooper create a sketch before our eyes, pulling an image from his own imagination and, with a few strokes, bringing it to powerful life for us all. And I felt inspired to pull out my own sketch pad and begin to capture images on paper again.

As an agent, I felt privileged to talk with numerous writers, helping them to shape their opening pages and answering questions that they had about their own works, their own careers.  And their enthusiasm to strive for the best in their craft was the most inspiring takeaway of all.

So, if you are currently sitting alone somewhere, squirreled away with your computer, and in need of some inspiration, then start looking around for a writer’s conference that might be coming up in your area.  For folks who write or illustrate for children and young adults, you can’t go wrong with an event that SCBWI will host. For those in the romance realm, Romance Writer’s of America chapters also offer regional conferences and events.  And there are countless other writer’s organizations and programs that host a program that might be close to you.

So step out, meet creative people, learn and share. And be inspired!  Maybe I’ll see you there.

(For my upcoming conference schedule, you can click here.)

 

*Marie is an Associate Agent at the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency in New York City.  To keep up with all her posts, subscribe to her site by clicking on the “Subscribe to Marie’s site here” link located on her page on the upper left margin.